Jan Ullrich: The Best There Never Was

£12.5
FREE Shipping

Jan Ullrich: The Best There Never Was

Jan Ullrich: The Best There Never Was

RRP: £25.00
Price: £12.5
£12.5 FREE Shipping

In stock

We accept the following payment methods

Description

If you want I could also name several doped ex-athletes in cycling and beyond who get moral and financial support today… without having ever had any relation with DDR, imagine that. The book places Ullrich’s life in the wider context, the fall of the Berlin Wall and German reunification are more than a historic and political soundtrack, these events shapes lives. Well apparently Gabriele is very sensitive about East Germany… As Inrng often says, it gives more informations about you than about the subject when you react so strongly to what is at worst a slightly deflected review of a book you didn’t read. There’s exploration on when Ullrich might have started using EPO and whether he was a victim of the East German state doping program. There’s injury, drink-driving, a doping ban following an out-of-competition test after a nightclub and the slide begins.

I thoroughly enjoyed it and it certainly isn’t an assassination piece on the DDR, which, if I understand you correctly is what you’re assuming? Note the disproportionate relative weight of whatever *supposed* doping Ullrich *might* have experienced when 13 to 15 in the DDR, and… the huge rest of his sporting experience – including lots of proven facts about him himself and his team – but now we’re *even* speaking “doping in the DDR”: that explains better than anything else what I’m trying to communicate about perspective, stereotypes, idées reçues and so on. And let me be clear: I consider it fairer to treat people as “we” do with Basso than as it happened with Ullrich. Jan Ullrich’s career was part of this, his first win suggested he’d dominate the Tour, and with it the sport for years to come.

Barely a mention about the role of “Western” universities, medical national institutions, Olympic committees etc. The point is that when doping is strongly related to some of the State’s power structures (as it was in the DDR, for sure… and pretty much everywhere else) it becomes harder to tackle for a series of reason.

Let’s leave the Keul and Southern (Federal) Germany universities surprise to the readers of the book, then. Doping is one among the lead themes of the piece (obviously), and the DDR is being related to that (not as obviously), while other *strongly* related subjects, albeit present in the book (dunno to what extent), hadn’t appeared at all before I named them, despite being by far more relevant both in Ullrich’s history and for their general interest regarding “sport medicine”.Doping Opfer Hilfe (essentially focussed on victims of State doping under the DDR) is probably one of the best possible examples of the serious issues which may be fostered by this kind of notable (and declared) ideological biases. I think that if there’s a contrast in attitudes of sort to reflect about is how singling out DDR allows us to “forget” all the time what USADA was doing, or CONI and so on and on. It’s “the same USADA” (not exactly *the same* of course), covering up doped Olympic medallists or catching Lance.

As I said previously the author went to great lengths to not just make the book a lazy finger pointing job at the old East. He was soon also voted Germany’s most popular sportsperson of all time, and his rivalry with Lance Armstrong defined the most controversial years of the Tour de France. A small picture of Walter Ulbricht with His Antikapitalist and Antiformalist glasses may calm you down : https://media2.

I got the impression that the author went to great lengths to not make this book an “East Vs West” narrative. Ullrich himself isn’t interviewed but that might not be any loss, one of the reasons for his troubles with the media over the years stems from him just not being that articulate in set-piece interviews. Then came 1997 and Stage 10 from Luchon to Arcalis, a ski station in Andorra whose name today still seems to evoke Ullrich’s ascent, the day he rode the field off his wheel, his flat back, a gold earning dangling and the black, red, gold bands of the Bundesflagge on his jersey. The 1997 Tour win is symbolic for a country trying to reunite, easterners could see one of their own winning, westerners can celebrate their gain as the first – and only – German Tour winner, it was an act of unification itself.



  • Fruugo ID: 258392218-563234582
  • EAN: 764486781913
  • Sold by: Fruugo

Delivery & Returns

Fruugo

Address: UK
All products: Visit Fruugo Shop